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Updated: 13 weeks 2 days ago

Film Screening: Future Baby, Apr 6

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
Please join us at 5:00 pm on April 6th, 2017 at UC Berkeley for a free screening of FUTURE BABY, the just-released documentary about the future of human reproduction as it unfolds right before our eyes.

Comments and Q&A after the screening by UC Hastings Professor Radhika Rao and UC Davis Professor Lisa Ikemoto.

Light snacks and refreshments will be provided at no additional cost!

This is the third and last event of the 2017 Being Human in a Biotech Age Film Series at UC Berkely.

About the Film:
FUTURE BABY is a film about the future of human reproduction as it is happening right before our eyes. Maria Arlamovsky’s exploration takes her all around the world - to patients and researchers, to egg donors and surrogate mothers, to laboratories and clinics. The hopes and wishes of future parents mesh with research on how to "upgrade" human embryos in the face of an ever accelerating rate of progress. How far do we want to go?

About the speakers:
RADHIKA RAO teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, comparative constitutional law, property, and the law of the human body at UC Hastings School of Law. She has been a visiting professor at Brooklyn Law School, the University of Michigan Law School, and the University of Trento in Italy
Professor Rao has written articles on abortion, assisted reproduction, cloning, stem cell research, genetic privacy, gene patenting, and property rights in the human body. She was a member of the California Advisory Committee on Human Cloning, and currently serves on the California Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research Advisory Committee.

LISA IKEMOTO teaches bioethics, health care law, public health law, reproductive rights, law & policy, and marital property. Her research areas include reproductive and genetic technology uses, health care disparities, and public health law. More specifically, she focuses on the ways that race and gender mediate access to and impacts of biomedical technology use and health care. Her recent work addresses reproductive tourism, the ways in which human gamete use links the fertility and biotechnology industries, and the privatizing effects of informed consent. Professor Ikemoto is a Bioethics Associate of the U.C. Davis Health System Bioethics Program, and a Faculty Associate of the U.C. Davis Center for Science and Innovation Studies.

For more information about the film The State of Eugenics and to watch the trailer, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dy8HT5sy0LY.

Being Human in a Biotech Age is organized by:
The Center for Genetics and Society
http://geneticsandsociety.org/
Center for Science, Technology, Medicine and Society
http://cstms.berkeley.edu/
Gender & Women's Studies - Chau Hoi Shuen Gender and Science Initiative
http://womensstudies.berkeley.edu/
http://womensstudies.berkeley.edu/research/genderandscience
Boalt Healthcare and Biotech Law Society
https://sites.google.com/site/healthcarebiotechlawsociety/

and co-sponsored by:
Department of Ethnic Studies
http://ethnicstudies.berkeley.edu/
Berkeley Center for Law and Technology
https://www.law.berkeley.edu/research/bclt/
UC Berkeley Disability Studies
http://disability-studies.ugis.berkeley.edu/

About the Being Human in a Biotech Age Film Series:
With powerful new biotechnologies now emerging, the prospect of creating humans with “better” genetic characteristics is on the horizon. Some support these technologies as a way to "seize control of human evolution" or as an efficient means of producing "enhanced" children and future generations. Others believe that they would encourage efforts to engineer children to specification, and that creating genetically modified humans would open the door to new forms of inequality, discrimination and conflict. This film series explores what it means to be human in a biotech age.

On Belonging: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity in Japan, Apr 7

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
The UC Berkeley Center for Japanese Studies presents its fourth annual graduate student conference: On Belonging: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity in Japan. We invite proposals for papers from current graduate students and recent graduates from any discipline that focus on past and present inquiries into and expressions of identity and community formation vis-à-vis gender and sexuality in Japan. In particular we welcome abstracts that explore the role of identity (including gendered, sexual, social, and ethnic) in relation to Japanese Buddhist institutions, texts, and community practices.

This conference will also explore representations of and critical engagements with notions of gender, sexuality, and identity that illuminate where and how interpretations of such concepts have manifested barriers to belonging in the forms of discrimination and marginalization.

Friday, April 7, 2017

(2:00-2:10p)
OPENING REMARKS - Prof. Dana Buntrock

(2:10-3:40p)
Panel 1: "Transformations, Gender, and Buddhism in the Popular Imaginary"
• Kim McNelly (UCLA)
• Deirdre Clyde (University of Hawaii, Manoa)
• Stephanie Hohlios (UC Berkeley)
Respondent: Professor Mark Blum, Shinjo Ito Distinguished Chair in Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley

(3:40-4:00p)
BREAK

(4:00-5:30p)
KEYNOTE TALK: Professor Jessica Main, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chair in Buddhism and Contemporary Society, University of British Columbia

Saturday, April 8, 2017

(9:45-9:55a)
OPENING REMARKS

(9:55-11:25a)
Panel 2: "Constructing Race and Gender"
• Wakako Suzuki (UCLA)
• Lani Alden (University of Colorado, Boulder)
• Asheli Mosley (International Christian University)
Respondent: Professor Alan Tansman, Louis B. Agassiz Chair in Japanese, UC Berkeley

(11:25-11:45a)
BREAK

(11:45-1:15p)
Panel 3: "The Construction and Consumption of Gender and Sexuality"
• Sayo Sakamoto (University of Washington)
• Hannah Dodd (Ohio State University)
• Kirsten Seuffert (USC)
Respondent: Professor Joseph Lavery, UC Berkeley

(1:15-2:00p)
LUNCH

(2:00-3:30p)
Panel 4: "Voice, Identity, and the Performance of Community"
• Pedro Bassoe (UC Berkeley)
• Pontus Andersson (University of Helsinki)
• Justine Wiesinger (Yale)
Respondent: Professor Jessica Main, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chair in Buddhism and Contemporary Society, University of British Columbia

(3:30-3:50p)
BREAK

(3:50-5:20)
Panel 5: "Economies of Identity"
• Andrea Horbinski (UC Berkeley)
• Valerie Black (UC Berkeley)
• Caitlin Casiello (Yale)
Respondent: Professor Karen Nakamura, UC Berkeley

(5:20-5:30p)
CLOSING REMARKS Prof. Dana Buntrock

On Belonging: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity in Japan, Apr 8

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
The UC Berkeley Center for Japanese Studies presents its fourth annual graduate student conference: On Belonging: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity in Japan. We invite proposals for papers from current graduate students and recent graduates from any discipline that focus on past and present inquiries into and expressions of identity and community formation vis-à-vis gender and sexuality in Japan. In particular we welcome abstracts that explore the role of identity (including gendered, sexual, social, and ethnic) in relation to Japanese Buddhist institutions, texts, and community practices.

This conference will also explore representations of and critical engagements with notions of gender, sexuality, and identity that illuminate where and how interpretations of such concepts have manifested barriers to belonging in the forms of discrimination and marginalization.

Friday, April 7, 2017

(2:00-2:10p)
OPENING REMARKS - Prof. Dana Buntrock

(2:10-3:40p)
Panel 1: "Transformations, Gender, and Buddhism in the Popular Imaginary"
• Kim McNelly (UCLA)
• Deirdre Clyde (University of Hawaii, Manoa)
• Stephanie Hohlios (UC Berkeley)
Respondent: Professor Mark Blum, Shinjo Ito Distinguished Chair in Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley

(3:40-4:00p)
BREAK

(4:00-5:30p)
KEYNOTE TALK: Professor Jessica Main, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chair in Buddhism and Contemporary Society, University of British Columbia

Saturday, April 8, 2017

(9:45-9:55a)
OPENING REMARKS

(9:55-11:25a)
Panel 2: "Constructing Race and Gender"
• Wakako Suzuki (UCLA)
• Lani Alden (University of Colorado, Boulder)
• Asheli Mosley (International Christian University)
Respondent: Professor Alan Tansman, Louis B. Agassiz Chair in Japanese, UC Berkeley

(11:25-11:45a)
BREAK

(11:45-1:15p)
Panel 3: "The Construction and Consumption of Gender and Sexuality"
• Sayo Sakamoto (University of Washington)
• Hannah Dodd (Ohio State University)
• Kirsten Seuffert (USC)
Respondent: Professor Joseph Lavery, UC Berkeley

(1:15-2:00p)
LUNCH

(2:00-3:30p)
Panel 4: "Voice, Identity, and the Performance of Community"
• Pedro Bassoe (UC Berkeley)
• Pontus Andersson (University of Helsinki)
• Justine Wiesinger (Yale)
Respondent: Professor Jessica Main, The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Chair in Buddhism and Contemporary Society, University of British Columbia

(3:30-3:50p)
BREAK

(3:50-5:20)
Panel 5: "Economies of Identity"
• Andrea Horbinski (UC Berkeley)
• Valerie Black (UC Berkeley)
• Caitlin Casiello (Yale)
Respondent: Professor Karen Nakamura, UC Berkeley

(5:20-5:30p)
CLOSING REMARKS Prof. Dana Buntrock

Looking at Okinawa: Race, Gender, Nation, Apr 9

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
This is a one-day event being held in order to create a dialogue on issues of race and gender in the study of Okinawa, and to contemplate the relationship between the study of Japan and the study of Okinawa.

We will initiate this dialogue with a lecture by photographer Ishikawa Mao, whose work explores the complex relationships of gender, race, and national identity in Okinawa and Japan. Her works have included including candid photographs of African American servicemen and their Okinawan and Japanese wives and girlfriends in Okinawa in the 1970s; and portraits of Japanese and Okinawan people with the national flag of Japan, interacting with it in various ways to demonstrate their complicated and often troubled relationship with the nation of Japan. Ishikawa is to give a slide show and talk about her work, focussing on her photographs of African American servicemen.

In the afternoon, we will hold a discussion between scholars, students, and members of the public, to be led by Professor Wendy Matsumura (UCSD) and Professor Annmaria Shimabuku (NYU), who, from the fields of cultural studies, sociology, and history, have been engaged in thinking about the role of Okinawan studies and its place in Japanese studies more generally. We will discuss what it means to study Okinawa in the American academy, and, drawing on Ishikawa's work, we will examine the complicated role of race and gender in Japanese studies and Okinawan studies.


Presenter bios:

Ishikawa Mao is an Okinawan photographer, who has been active since the 1970s. Having studied with Tomatsu Shomei in Tokyo, she went on to photograph soldiers and locals in Okinawa and Japan, and over 40 years has created a candid and intimate style of photography which humanizes her subjects while also offering political critique.

Wendy Matsumura is assistant professor of history at the University of California, San Diego. She works on Okinawan history, as well as the history of labor and race in the Japanese Empire. Her book, The Limits of Okinawa: Japanese Capitalism, Living Labor, and Theorizations of Community, was published by Duke University Press in 2015.

Annmaria Shimabuku is assistant professor of East Asian Studies at New York University. She works on postcolonial feminism and theories of race in Japan, Okinawa, and beyond.

Visual Vocabularies and Queer Citizenships, Apr 20

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
The Center for Race & Gender Thursday Forum Series presents...
Visual Vocabularies & Queer Citizenships

Recuperating Afro-Indigenous Pasts: Collage Art and the Case of Undocumented Migration
Alan Palaez Lopez, Comparative Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley

What does it mean to live in the United States as an undocumented Black and Indigenous immigrant? What types of memories do the undocumented have access to? This paper serves as a preliminary exploration of the ways in which undocumented immigrants develop visual and literary vocabularies in which to narrate their stories. Particularly, I focus on the collage-art of Afro-Oaxacan visual artists and botanist, Yesi. Through artist interviews, text exchanges, close readings and visual critiques of her work, I argue that Yesi’s use of collage-art serves as a method of creating counter-memories, recuperating past(s), contextualizing the present, and re-imagining an afro-indigenous future.

Islamicate Sexualities: Locating Race and Gender within the History of Sexuality
Andrew Gayed, York University

I will use visual art to investigate Middle Eastern homosexuality and focus on issues of Modernity, multiple Modernisms, and the West’s claim to Modernity. This discussion will have us thinking about Arab homo-sexualities in terms of desire and alternative masculinities rather than Western notions of visibility and coming out; narratives which are not conducive to understanding how Queer Arabs living in the West experience their sexuality. This is a discussion rooted in sociological ideas of gender, nationalism, and sexuality, and the triangulation of identity and oppression that could arise at their intersection. My intent is to see if we can reach a narrative of Western and non-Western Modernity that works beyond sexual oppression (Middle East) versus sexual acceptance (North America), and instead examines a negotiation of diasporic sexuality by incorporating different sociological strategies to help self-identification categories be less dichotomous.

Gay Arab societies enjoy subtle networks of expressing sexualities and identities, and these networks have been strongly influenced and changed by discourses of modernity and Western imperialism. Through case studies of visual art, this analysis will illustrate how the legacy of modernity has not yet erased these subtle networks of communication, and how diasporic subjects are conflicted by adhering to multiple identity narratives from multiple cultural sources. It is my contention that diasporic identity and sexuality can globally portray the culturally-specific local narratives of sexuality. In this way, we can see how local sexuality narratives are not passively being colonized by Western Queer discourse; instead, localized understandings of sexualities are being internalized and conceptualized by the diaspora, and the contemporary art they produce. The visual art of diasporic artists living in the West in conjunction with Queer artists living and working in the Middle East can contribute to understanding these local identity narratives, and how they manifest themselves in the lives of diasporic subjects globally.

Landscapes of Intimacy
Marco Antonio Flores, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley

Investments in Vulnerability: The Limits of Charity and Protection, Apr 27

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
The Center for Race & Gender Thursday Forum Series presents...

Investments in Vulnerability: The Limits of Charity & Protection

Sustaining the Disability Community: The Weaving of Activism, Kinship, and Cash Economies
Dr. Juliann Anesi, Gender and Women’s Studies Department

Aoga Fiamalamalama and Loto Taumafai Schools are non-governmental organizations (NGOs), established in the 1970s for students with intellectual and physical disabilities in Samoa (an independent state in the Pacific). The impact of NGOs on “vulnerable communities” in developing countries is fraught with questions about the long-term benefits of such organizations to the local communities. This talk focuses on the limits of international aid in creating educational institutions for disabled students. Specifically, I examine the funding from organizations in New Zealand, Japan, and the US and how the women organizers used these monies to sustain the schools. I analyze the creative fundraising strategies by the schools and the impact of inconsistent funding to NGOs. I will discuss how international aid programs are tools of neocolonial monitoring practices for developing nations.

Proper Victim as Proper Police: The Legal Sanctuary of Immigrant Injury and Sexual Violence
Dr. Lee Ann Wang, Berkeley School of Law

What does it mean to participate in an immigration raid in order to provide legal assistance to survivors of gender and sexual violence? On the one hand, the raid is a site of migration management through punishment, and on the other, an unfurling of protection and its possibilities. Such practices actually serve each other but are rarely seen as such. How is it then, that we have come to understand the beginnings of legal protection as so distinctly removed from punishment? This talk will discuss the forms of writing the law undergoes in order to establish the terms of protection in U.S. immigration law. Focusing on post 9/11 counter-terrorism measures through various points of increasing federal and local “cooperation,” I analyze the place of the Violence Against Women Act and immigrant protection provisions. I will discuss the role of rescue narratives and the law’s writing of racial injury. Both, are sites where immigrant women’s experiences are used to activate mechanisms of policing and punishment in ways that extend far beyond their own bodies and communities.

FORGETTING VIETNAM, a film by Trinh Minh-ha, Apr 28

April 9, 2017 - 8:18am
Center for Race & Gender Special Film Presentation

FORGETTING VIETNAM
a film by Prof. Trinh T. Minh-ha
Gender & Women’s Studies and Rhetoric

Friday, Apr. 28, 2017
5:00 pm
Multicultural Community Center
MLK, Jr. Student Union Building, UC Berkeley
(Location is wheelchair accessible. Event organized by the CRG Arts & Humanities Initiative.)

Touching on a trauma of international scale, FORGETTING VIETNAM is made in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war and of its survivors. Vietnam in ancient times was named đất nứớc vạn xuân—the land of ten thousand springs. Using images of contemporary life that unfold as a dialogue between land and water, influential feminist theorist and filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha’s lyrical film essay draws inspiration from ancient legend and from water as a force evoked in every aspect of Vietnamese culture, creating a third space of historical and cultural re-memory—what local inhabitants, immigrants and veterans remember of yesterday’s stories to comment on today’s events.

Bio: Born in Vietnam, Trinh T. Minh-ha is a filmmaker, writer and music composer, and Professor of Gender & Women's Studies at UC Berkeley. Trinh Minh-ha has traveled and lectured extensively - in the States, as well as in Europe, Asia, Australia and New Zealand - on film, art, feminism, and cultural politics. She is also the recipient of many distiguished awards and grants. Among her many influential films, publications, and multi-media installations, Trinh T. Minh-ha is the author of Lovecidal. Walking with The Disappeared (2016), D-Passage. The Digital Way (2013), Elsewhere Within Here (Immigration, Refugeeism and The Boundary Event, 2010); The Digital Film Event (2005), Cinema Interval (1999), Framer Framed (on film, 1992), When the Moon Waxes Red, (on representation, gender and cultural politics, 1991), Woman, Native, Other (on post-coloniality and feminism, 1989), and En minuscules (poems, 1987). Learn more about Trinh T. Minh-ha and her powerful body of work.