News

Professor Juana María Rodríguez appearing on Canadian television to talk about gender issues in this years election.
http://bit.ly/2fAAlOi

Laura Fantone will be visiting faculty at the Globalization and Diversity International Summer School 2017, Georg-August Universitat in Goettingen, Germany.

Laura Fantone has a forthcoming book (2017): Local Invisibilities, Postcolonial Feminisms: Asian American Contemporary Artists in California, Palgrave Series on Critical Studies in Gender, Sexuality and Culture

Genome Editing platform report; part of the Nuffield Council on Bioethics

Science FARE's letter to the editor of Nature: "Include social equity in California Biohub"

Keynote Lectures

  • Keynote speaker at 'Roots and Routes: Movement, Mobility and Belonging Conference', University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, May​ 2016​.
  • Keynote Speaker at ‘Interdisciplinary Innovations in the Study of Religion and Gender,’ Utrecht University, the Netherlands, February 2015.

Invited Presentations and talks:

  • Paper on “War Movies and Fractured Notions of Masculinity” at Duke university in October 2015.
  • Presentation at 'Sexualities and Queer Imaginaries Conference' at Brown University.
  • Paper on "Iranian Studies Encountering Queer Studies", Tufts University, March 2016.
  • Presentation on "Islamic Nationalism and Transnationalism" for The Iranian Studies Program, Oklahoma University, April 2016. 
  • ​"Women and the Iranian Revolution of 1979", Summer ​Institute for ​Community ​College ​Teachers,​ International and ​Area Studies Institutes​,​ ​June 3, 2016, ​UC Berkeley. 

Conference Panels:

  • ​P​aper on "The Empire of Merchandise" at CASAR conference in Beirut​, Lebanon​, January 2016.​

Other​ panels:

  • ​Panel Chair, 'Fragmenting Empires', ​CASAR conference in Beirut​, Lebanon​, January 2016.
  • Presented and moderated a panel celebrating International Women's Day, International House, UC Berkeley, March 2015.
  • Panelist, 'Reporting Islam', International House, UC Berkeley, April 2016.​
  • Commentator​ for President's Postdoctoral Scholar Lila Sharif, "A Taste for Palestine", Center for Race and Gender's Thursday Forum Series, March 2016.
  • “Revisiting the Mostazaf and the Mostakbar,” in Feminist Futures, New edition, Zed Press.
    Contributors: John Foran; Jane Wambui Njagi; Anjali Prabhu; Akanksha Munshi-Kurian; Banu Subramaniam; Gauri Nandedkar; Priya Kurian; Debashish Munshi; Kum-Kum Bhavnani; Anna Tsing; Rachel Simon-Kumar; Raka Ray; Jan Nederveen Pieterse; Dana Collins; Peter Chua; David McKie; Joni Seager; Arturo Escobar; Wendy Harcourt; Light Carruyo; Minoo Moallem; Ming-yan Lai mylai; Linda Klouzal; Susanne Schech; Sangion Tui; Julie Shayne; Yvonne Underhill-Sem
     
  • Article​ entitled "The unintended consequences of equality within difference" published by Brown Journal of Public Affairs, fall 20​1​5.

CALL FOR GSI APPLICATIONS - Spring 2017

The Gender and Women’s Studies Department is accepting applications for a Graduate Student Instructor to assist in teaching a course with the following title and description:
 
GWS 10: Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies
An introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women’s studies. Critical study of the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion, and age. Questions will be addressed within the context of a transnational world.

 
Applicants should have a background in contemporary feminist theory and feminist issues.  Applicants must be registered graduate students at UC Berkeley, enrolled in a minimum of 12 units in the Spring 2017 semester, and must not have a fellowship which precludes employment.
 
For consideration, send a cover letter stating your interest and background, a current CV, listing all post-baccalaureate teaching experience, most recent teaching evaluations, a copy of your current academic transcript, and names/phone# of 2 academic references to:  Althea Grannum-Cummings, Gender and Women’s Studies, 608 Barrows Hall--#1070,  Berkeley, CA  94720-1070. 

DEADLINE – October 31, 2016

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

topics:
 
Gender and Popular Cultures
Gender and Sexuality in Global Issues

The Department of Gender and Women's Studies invites UC Berkeley graduate students to submit proposals for Summer Session 2017. Proposals for summer courses should include a course title, a preliminary syllabus, your CV, student evaluations and contact information. Summer Session courses in Gender and Women's Studies attract students from many different fields and departments so course design should be interdisciplinary and geared towards students who are not majors. We are looking for rigorous, innovative, and inviting ideas for courses on the above topics relating to women, gender, and sexuality. Other topics that will engage undergraduates will be accepted. The Department is committed to intersectional approaches which include race, class, ethnicity, coloniality, disability, etc.... This proposed course maybe considered as an American Culture’s course.
 
Please send 2 copies of proposals to Dept. Chair, c/o Althea Grannum Cummings, Gender and Women’s Studies Dept., UCB, 608 Barrows--1070, Berkeley, 94720-1070
 
DEADLINE – OCTOBER 3, 2016

GWS student Sahra Agahi and GWS Alum Courtney Sarkin have been awarded internships in the Women’s Empowerment Program at the Alameda County Family Justice Center.

The Alameda County Family Justice Center is made up of over 30 onsite and over 50 offsite agencies and programs that provide services and support to individuals and families who have experienced domestic violence, sexual assault and exploitation, child abuse, elder and dependent adult abuse, and stalking.

These internships are very competitive on account of having direct contact with clients and being the largest and most comprehensive center in Alameda County providing services to DV, sexual assault, trafficking, elder abuse and child abuse victims/survivors.

Congratulations Sahra and Courtney!

In Spring 2016, Professor Rodríguez's LGBT 146 class Cultural Representations of Sexuality created Wikipedia pages to highlight the contributions of queers of colors, with a particular emphasis on local California LGBTQ activists. This class was featured in a blog by Cathy Davidson from HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory) a site dedicated to promoting the Digital Humanities in Academia. 

Check out the article here: https://www.hastac.org/blogs/cathy-davidson/2016/05/20/how-go-standard-issue-term-paper-social-change-heres-one-model

Andrea Ikeda, GWS/Ethnic Studies major, and a recipient of the 2015 Charlene Conrad Liebau Library Prize for Undergraduate Research has an exhibit at Doe Library! Go check it out, it is based on her outstanding senior thesis, Cowboys, Indians, and Aliens: White Supremacy in the Klamath Basin, 1826-1946.

http://blogs.lib.berkeley.edu/whats-new.php/student-designed-exhibit-in-doe

Trinh Minh-ha's new film, Forgetting Vietnam (90 mins), has been premiered in the International Competition of the 2016 Film Festival Cinéma du Réel in Paris at the Centre Pompidou. It will show in California at the following dates and places:

Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival 
Saturday, April 23rd at 2:00 pm
Tateuchi Democracy Forum, 111 North Central Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90012

California State University, Sacramento 
Saturday, April 16 at 6:00 pm
Hinde Auditorium of the University Student Union

Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
Thursday & Friday, May 12th & 13th at 7: 30 pm
701 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

Vietnam in ancient times was named đất nứớc vạn xuân – the land of ten thousand springs. One of the myths surrounding the creation of Vietnam involves a fight between two dragons whose intertwined bodies fell into the South China Sea and formed Vietnam’s curving ‘S’ shaped coastline. Legend also has it that Vietnam’s ancestors were born from the union of a Dragon King, Lạc Long Quân and a fairy, Âu Cơ. Âu Cơ was a mythical bird that swallowed a handful of earthly soil and consequently lost the power to return to the 36th Heaven. Her tears formed Vietnam’s myriad rivers and the country’s recurring floods are the land’s way of remembering her.

In her geo-political situation, Vietnam thrives on a fragile equilibrium between land and water management. A life-sustaining power, water is evoked in every aspect of the culture.

Shot in Hi-8 video in 1995 and in HD and SD in 2012, the images unfold spatially as a dialogue between the two elements—land and water—that underlie the formation of the term “country” (đất nứớc). Carrying the histories of both visual technology and Vietnam’s political reality, these images are also meant to feature the encounter between the ancient as related to the solid earth, and the new as related to the liquid changes in a time of rapid globalization. In conversation with these two parts is a third space, that of historical and cultural re-memory – or what local inhabitants, immigrants and veterans remember of yesterday’s stories to comment on today’s events. Through the insights of these witnesses to one of America’s most divisive wars, Vietnam’s specter and her contributions to world history remain both present and all too easy to forget. Touching on a trauma of international scale, Forgetting Vietnam is made in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war and of its survivors.

Recent article in the Daily Californian with quotes by GWS Professor Leslie Salzinger and GWS Professor and Chair Charis Thompson.

And here is the full text Professor Thompson sent to the Daily Cal when asked to comment for the article:

Despite a widespread perception that it is much too little, much too late, we welcome the formation of a Chancellor's Committee on Sexual Violence, Harassment and Assault to address failures of process in handling cases of sexual harassment and violence at UC Berkeley. We thank Dean Hesse for her service and will continue as a Department to help in every way we can.

In long term and more recent conversations between faculty from the department of Gender and Women's Studies/other feminist faculty/allies and senior leadership, and through ongoing interactions with our exceptional students and friends of the department, members of the Department of Gender and Women's Studies have articulated the following additional urgent goals:  

a) Many have asked for an admission and analysis of, and apology for, mistakes in the recent past to indicate that the upper administration really "gets it" and is ready and able to move forward

b) We are seeking a commitment to taking the intersectional and power dynamics of these cases more seriously, including addressing the lighter sentences given to high profile faculty members in cases with the greatest power differentials, and including working to eliminate various kinds of bullying, for example of staff by faculty, that are related to but not identical with sexual harassment

c) We need a commitment from the administration to make sure that more people can benefit from the research and teaching on gender, sexuality, race, class, disability, power, and violence in which the campus excels; currently, this work is too optional, too marginal, and often doesn't reach those in parts of the campus with the most work to do to realize campus Equity & Inclusion goals.  

Without these additional foci, we believe it will be hard to bring about the needed deep culture change on campus away from a reactive, crisis-driven approach and toward a sustainable preventative climate.

Berkeley has the opportunity to be a leader through learning from past mistakes. We hope to see announcements from the upper administration on these issues shortly. 

GWS40 

GWS111.2

 

Gender and Women's Studies alum and former Haas Scholar Matt Grigorieff in the news. Congratulations Matt!

The February 19th GWS workshop Making Families was a great success. Check out the archived videos here.

Professor Rodríguez will be the 2016 Washington University Distinguished Visiting Scholar and deliver a lecture entitled "The Women of Casa Xochiquetzal: Corporeal Encounters, Queer Feelings" as part of the prestigious Assembly Series at Washington University. In addition to her Assembly Series Address, Rodríguez will meet with faculty, hold a graduate research workshop, speak with undergraduate student groups, and attend a few select WGSS classes. Professor Rodríguez’s lecture is sponsored by the Office of the Provost, and will be the first Assembly Series Address to be hosted by the Department of Women, Sexuality and Gender Studies as part of their Decentering the West Lecture Series. 

Below is link to an interview with Professor Rodríguez regarding her work and her visit to Washington University.

http://artsci.wustl.edu/news-ampersand/articles/2016/juana-maria-rodriguez

Vietnam in ancient times was named đất nứớc vạn xuân – the land of ten thousand springs. One of the myths surrounding the creation of Vietnam involves a fight between two dragons whose intertwined bodies fell into the South China Sea and formed Vietnam’s curving ‘S’ shaped coastline. Legend also has it that Vietnam’s ancestors were born from the union of a Dragon King, Lạc Long Quân and a fairy, Âu Cơ. Âu Cơ was a mythical bird that swallowed a handful of earthly soil and consequently lost the power to return to the 36th Heaven. Her tears formed Vietnam’s myriad rivers and the country’s recurring floods are the land’s way of remembering her.

In her geo-political situation, Vietnam thrives on a fragile equilibrium between land and water management. A life-sustaining power, water is evoked in every aspect of the culture.

Shot in Hi-8 video in 1995 and in HD and SD in 2012, the images unfold spatially as a dialogue between the two elements—land and water—that underlie the formation of the term “country” (đất nứớc). Carrying the histories of both visual technology and Vietnam’s political reality, these images are also meant to feature the encounter between the ancient as related to the solid earth, and the new as related to the liquid changes in a time of rapid globalization. In conversation with these two parts is a third space, that of historical and cultural re-memory – or what local inhabitants, immigrants and veterans remember of yesterday’s stories to comment on today’s events. Through the insights of these witnesses to one of America’s most divisive wars, Vietnam’s specter and her contributions to world history remain both present and all too easy to forget. Touching on a trauma of international scale, Forgetting Vietnam is made in commemoration of the 40th anniversary of the end of the war and of its survivors.

Blog by Chancellor's Professor Nancy Scheper Hughes, Department of Anthropology and GWS Affiliated Faculty member.

Performance Studies graduate student, Miyuki Baker, interviews Professor Rodríguez for her innovative series, Beyond the Ivory Tower, a series of blog posts that combines drawings with interviews to demystify the world of academic life. 

https://heymiyuki.wordpress.com/2015/11/30/beyond-the-ivory-tower-interv...

In this podcast from NPR's Latino USA, Professor Rodríguez is invited to talk about "Latinx: The Ungendering of the Spanish Language"

http://latinousa.org/2016/01/29/latinx-ungendering-spanish-language/

Check out Professor Minoo Moallem's new essay entitled "The unintended consequences of equality within difference" published by Brown Journal of Public Affairs in February 2016. 

Abstract:
In the aftermath of the Iranian revolution of 1979 and with the circula- tion of the liberal discourse of equality by both women’s groups and human rights advocates that participated in the Iranian revolution, the newly formed Islamic Republic distinguished itself by claiming that women under the Islamic constitution and jurisprudence are not necessarily unequal to men, but rather that their equality is based on the Islamic recognition of their difference. The discourse of equality within difference has clearly created space for debate and discussion with regard to women and gender issues in the context of the Iranian Parliament—a development that brings different and competing interpretations of Islamic jurisprudence to the surface.

CALL FOR GSI APPLICATIONS IN LGBT STUDIES FOR FALL 2016

The LGBT Minor is accepting applications for two Graduate Student Instructors to assist in teaching a course with the following title and description:

LGBT 20AC: Alternative Sexual Identities and Communities. An introduction to varied dimensions of alternative sexual identities in the contemporary United States, with a focus ranging from individuals to communities. This course will use historical, sociological, ethnographic, political-scientific, psychological, psychoanalytical, legal, medical, literary, and filmic materials to chart trends and movements from the turn of the century to the present.

Applicants should have a background in queer issues.  Applicants must be registered graduate students at UC Berkeley, enrolled in a minimum of 8 units in Fall 2016, and must not have a fellowship which precludes employment.

For consideration, send a cover letter stating your interest and background, a current CV, listing all post-baccalaureate teaching experience, a copy of the most recent academic transcript, student evaluations, and names/phone# of 2 academic references to: Althea Grannum Cummings, LGBT Minor Studies,  608 Barrows Hall--#1070,  Berkeley, CA  94720-1070.

DEADLINE IS MARCH 18, 2016

CALL FOR GSI APPLICATIONS - Fall 2016

The Gender and Women’s Studies Department is accepting applications for two Graduate Student Instructors to assist in teaching a course with the following title and description:
 
GWS 10: Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies. An introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women’s studies. Critical study of the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion, and age. Questions will be addressed within the context of a transnational world.
 
Applicants should have a background in contemporary feminist theory and feminist issues.  Applicants must be registered graduate students at UC Berkeley, enrolled in a minimum of 8 units in the Fall 2016 semester, and must not have a fellowship which precludes employment.
 
For consideration, send a cover letter stating your interest and background, a current CV, listing all post-baccalaureate teaching experience, most recent teaching evaluations, a copy of your current academic transcript, and names/phone# of 2 academic references to:  Althea Grannum-Cummings, Gender and Women’s Studies, 608 Barrows Hall--#1070,  Berkeley, CA  94720-1070. 

DEADLINE – March 18, 2016