News

Professor Charis Thompson in:

From IVF to Designer Babies, Technology Is Not Colorblind: How Afrofuturism can help create a more equal world for black bodies of the future

An article from the California Stem Cell Report, featuring Professor Charis Thompson.​

The $3 billion California stem cell agency next Thursday will convene a day-long examination of human gene editing, a field that could be a "gold mine for biotechnology" and perhaps alter the human race permanently.

The Barrows Hall All Gender Restroom in Context:
Q&A for the re-designated 6th floor Barrows restroom (PDF)

2015 Event Highlights by Professor Paola Bacchetta:

2015 Keynote. “Réflexions sur la sexualité et la decolonialite pour la France aujourd’hui.” Conference on Colonial and Decolonial Struggles in France: Yesterday and Today. Université du Havre, France. November 30. 

2015. “Planetarités Situées.” International Conference on Epistemologies of the Souths. Organized by École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and Collège International de Philosophie. Paris, France. November 26-28.

2015 “Queerphilia, Queerphobia and Islamophobia.” San Francisco State University. October 14.

2015 Keynote. “Décoloniser la Sexualité.”   7th International Conference on Francophone Feminist Research, University of Montreal. Montreal, Canada. August 26. Archived here: https://youtu.be/wAyMHheGDXs

2015    "Tendances, débats et enjeux de l'intersectionnalité dans les études feministes." Institute for Social Sciences, Free University. Brussels, Belgium. May 4.

2015    “Avoiding Deadly Encounters: Reflections on Decolonial Feminist and Queer of Color Solidarities.” University of Kent. Britain. March 18.

2015    “Planetarités  Situés.”  Collège International de Philosophie. Centre Parisien d’Études Critiques. Paris, France. March 5.

2015    Keynote. “Décoloniser Queer.” Annual Conference on Queer Studies. Institut d’Études  Politiques. Paris, France. March 2.

2015    “Queer et xénophobie dans le nationalisme hindou postcolonial .“  École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales. Paris, France. February 17.

2015    “Corps postcoloniaux genrés dans les imaginaires dominants et resistants.“  École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales. Paris, France.February 2.

Check out Paola Bacchetta’s keynote address from the 7th International Conference on Francophone Feminist Research, at University of Montreal on August 26, 2015.

Professor Rodríguez has won the Alan Bray Memorial Book Prize given by the GL/Q Caucus of the MLA for her book, Sexual Futures, Queer Gestures, and Other Latina Longings. This prize is given for an outstanding book in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer studies in literature and cultural studies. 

This is the second time that a Berkeley GWS member has won this prize, in 2014 Mel Chen's book Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect also won this prestigious book award for queer studies.

READERSHIP AVAILABLE IN LESBIAN, GAY BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER STUDIES

LGBT 145--Interpreting the Queer Past: Methods and Problems in the History of Sexuality
Instructor:  Paola Bacchetta <pbacchetta [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

Contact the instructor directly if you are interested in being a Reader for this course.

READERSHIPS AVAILABLE IN GENDER & WOMEN’S STUDIES

GWS 14--Gender, Sex and Race in Global Political Issues
Instructor:  Ayse Agis <aagis [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 100AC--Wilderness, Gender, Race and American Identity
Instructor:  Barbara Barnes <babarnes [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 101--Doing Feminist Research
Instructor:  Charis Thompson <charis [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 104--Advanced Feminist Theory
Instructor:  Barbara Barnes <babarnes [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 134--Gender and the Politics of Childhood
Instructor:  Laura Nelson <lcnelson [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 142--Women in the Muslim and Arab Worlds
Instructor:  Minoo Moallem <mmoalllem [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

GWS 144--Alternate Sexualities in a Transnational World
Instructor:  Natasha Distiller <natashadistiller [at] gmail [dot] com>

LGBT C148 -- Ethnicity, Gender and Sexuality
Instructor:  Jac Asher <jacasher [at] berkeley [dot] edu>

Please contact the instructor directly if you are interested in being a Reader for one of these courses.

In this article, Professor Rodríguez discusses statistics, queer theory, and mixed methodological approaches to the study of sexuality with DEWGS student Ragini Tharoor Srinivasan.

http://matrix.berkeley.edu/research/statistics-and-queer-theory

Professor Charis Thompson summarizes the recent debate on human germline gene editing and calls for a broader and more inclusive public discussion.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), with support and funding from the National Science Foundation, is currently seeking U.S. female faculty researchers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics ( STEM), from Minority-Serving Institutions, who are interested in attending the Gender Summit 8 (GS8), in Mexico, on April 28-29, 2016.
 
AAAS is releasing travel awards to US female faculty researchers to attend GS8, with the goal to create new international networks and initiate plans for future collaborations in STEM research, with counterparts abroad.
 
If you are interested in creating and developing International Research networks, submit your application today at the following link: http://www.aaas.org/news/call-applications-attend-gender-summit-8-mexico.
 
The deadline for submission is January 7, 2016 by 11:59 PM EDT.

Professor Charis Thompson on "Governance, Regulation and Control" at the International Summit on Human Gene Editing, Thursday, December 3rd. This event will be live broadcast by the National Academy of Sciences.

Professor Minoo Moallem has been busy with keynotes and guest lectures. Here are some highlights:

Laverne Cox will speak Wednesday, Dec. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pauley Ballroom. The program will include remarks by Vice Chancellor Na’ilah Nasir and an audience Q&A session moderated by Professor Juana María Rodriguez. While the event is open to the general public, members of the UC Berkeley community can pre-register for the free event — co-sponsored by the ASUC, the LEAD Center and Cross-Cultural Student Development.

Professor Juana María Rodríguez will be moderating a Q & A session with Emmy-nominated actress, documentary film producer, and transgender rights activist Laverne Cox. Cox will speak Wednesday, Dec. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pauley Ballroom. While the event is open to the general public, members of the UC Berkeley community can pre-register for the free event — co-sponsored by the ASUC, the LEAD Center and Cross-Cultural Student Development — beginning Friday, Nov. 20.

https://news.berkeley.edu/2015/11/17/laverne-cox-on-campus/

Read about the retrospective of Professor Trinh Minh-ha's films, happening in Rio de Janeiro.

A tigresa do Vietnã

Cinema de Trinh T. Minh-ha ganha retrospectiva na Caixa Cultural

American Studies Association Panel on "The Miseries of Marriage: What Queers Lose When We Win" with Lisa Duggan, Chandan Reddy, Susan Stryker, Chantal Nadeau and Kevin Murphy. Moderated by Jason Ruiz.
http://bit.ly/1LVLTVp

Professor Rodriguez starts at 3:30

For information on the Geoff Marcy case at UC Berkeley, see for example:
 

 

 

  • This statement represents the consensus reached by the UC Berkeley Astronomy Department graduate student community as of October 12th, 2015. (linked from New York Times)

 

 

CALL FOR GSI APPLICATIONS SPRING 2016
 

~GWS 10~ Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies 
The Gender and Women’s Studies Department is accepting applications for a Graduate Student Instructors to assist in teaching a course with the following title and description:
 
GWS 10: Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies. An introduction to questions and concepts in gender and women’s studies. Critical study of the formation of gender and its intersections with other relations of power, such as sexuality, racialization, class, religion, and age. Questions will be addressed within the context of a transnational world.
 
Applicants should have a background in contemporary feminist theory and feminist issues.  Applicants must be registered graduate students at UC Berkeley, enrolled in a minimum of 8 units in the Spring 2016 semester, and must not have a fellowship which precludes employment.
 
For consideration, send a cover letter stating your interest and background, a current CV, listing all post-baccalaureate teaching experience, most recent teaching evaluations, a copy of your current academic transcript, and names/phone# of 2 academic references to:
Paola Bacchetta, VC of Pedagogy, c/o Althea Grannum-Cummings, Gender and Women’s Studies,  608 Barrows Hall--#1070, Berkeley, CA  94720-1070.

DEADLINE – October 30, 2015

ALL FOR GSI APPLICATIONS SPRING 2016

~GWS 20~ Introduction to Feminist Theory.

The Gender and Women’s Studies Department is accepting applications for a Graduate Student Instructor to assist the instructor in teaching a course with the following title and description:
 
GWS 20:  Introduction to Feminist Theory.  An introduction to feminist theory.  Why study theory? What does theory do?  What forms does it take, and how and from where does the desire to theorize gender emerge?  What is the relationship between theory and social movements? This course will introduce students to these areas of contemporary inquiry.
 
Applicants should have some knowledge of contemporary feminist theory and feminist issues.  Applicants must be registered graduate students at UC Berkeley, enrolled in a minimum of 8 units in the Spring 2016semester, and must not have a fellowship which precludes employment.
 
For consideration, send a cover letter stating your interest and background, a current CV, listing all post-baccalaureate teaching experience, most recent teaching evaluations, a copy of your current academic transcript, and names/phone# of 2 academic references to:  

PAOLA BACCHETTA, VC of Pedagogy, c/o Althea Grannum-Cummings, Gender and Women’s Studies,  680 Barrows Hall--#1070,  Berkeley, CA  94720-1070.

 

DEADLINE – October 30, 2015

1.  That Gender and Women's Studies is only for people who identify as women.  There is an important political part of the history of the department that has to do with recognizing and fighting for the legal, political, and economic rights of women that the department's name acknowledges, and the gendered, racialized lives of particular women are the focus of several amazing scholars on this campus.  But gender is a system we all live within, and includes all genders; understanding and changing hierarchies in which gender and sexuality play a part requires the participation of everyone, including straight white men!  Everyone should take at least one gender and sexuality class at Cal to understand the ways masculinities and femininities, desire and sexuality, work as systems of power as well as - potentially - empowerment. 

2.  That Gender and Women's Studies is concerned only with middle class white women.  Again, there is an important part of the history of feminist thought that has been complicit with white privilege and class privilege, and has focused on gender equality as if it could be considered apart from socioeconomic inequality, racializations, citizenship status, decolonization, sexualities, disability, national context in a transnational world.  In our department, we try both to come to grips with that legacy of white privilege - not pretend it never happened and doesn't haunt us still - and teach all our classes from within a deep commitment to intersectionality (thinking about how different aspects of power are related) and a transnational awareness of the connections across internal borders within our own divided societies and with other parts of the world's labor, migration restrictions, and natural resources that sustain our global privilege within the United States.

3.  That Gender and Women's Studies is bad for you on the job market.  Quite to the contrary, majoring in Gender and Women's Studies, whether as a double major or alone, is extremely attractive to employers and graduate school admissions, from medical school and law school to NGOs, teaching, and business.  Employers like to see students who have taken classes that indicate sustained critical thinking and writing, as well as a commitment to social justice.

The Department has an immediate opening for a reader for the following courses for Fall Semester 2015:

GWS 40 
Gendered Ecologies: Exploring Human Non-Human Entanglements

Instructor:  Barbara Barnes <babarnes [at] berkeley [dot] edu>
TuTh 11-12:30/458 Evans

How might we understand, and intervene with, ecological crises such as global climate change, the nuclear disaster at Fukushima, the poisoning of communities through industrial and chemical production/consumption, and the displacement of communities after hurricanes, floods, or earthquakes? How might we understand such ecological crises as social crises, also rooted in entrenched social power relations? This class will explore these questions by starting with the idea that both nature and gender are constructed, and the constructions of these categories are historically reliant on one another. We will also take “gender” to be a complex and messy identity designation, always necessarily entangled with racialization and racism, and dependent upon time and place. Class discussions and assignments will explore how life is made possible within the relationships of human and nonhuman natures, how environments become less livable when those relationships are disregarded, and how the lines between “human” and “nonhuman” are (like “gender” and “nature”) made through politics (relations of power, including gender, race, and colonialism).

GWS 50AC 
Gender in American Culture

Instructor:  Barbara Barnes <babarnes [at] berkeley [dot] edu>
TuTh 3:30-5/390 Hearst Mining

This course will be an investigation into the complexities and variations of the term “America(n)” as it is inflected by gender and other power relations such as class, “race”/ethnicity, national origin, sexuality and location. Its central focus will be the concepts of “home” and “homeland”-----and the identities that constitute and complicate these concepts: family, citizen, native, immigrant, alien.

Please contact the instructor directly if you are interested in being a Reader for one of these classes.

READERSHIP AVAILABLE!
GENDER & WOMEN’S STUDIES

The Department has an immediate opening for a reader for the following course for Fall Semester 2015:

GWS 111.1 
GENDER AND CAPITALISM

Instructor:  Leslie Salzinger <lsalzinger [at] berkeley [dot] edu>
Wednesdays 2-5/210 Wheeler

Capitalism and gender both structure and enable daily life, and both are so pervasive as to become invisible. In this course, we will work to bring them into view, to explore their multiple points of connection, mutual reinforcement, and contradiction, and to make space to imagine more just ways of being. We will open the term reading theories of capitalism and social reproduction, and then move to explore capitalism’s empirical entanglement with gendered meanings and practices, both historically and in a variety of contemporary arenas (e.g. domestic labor, sex work, emotional labor, finance).

Please contact the instructor directly if you are interested in being a Reader for this course.

Professor Minoo Moallem gave the keynote address at the Conference on Religion, Gender and Body Politics in Holland in February 2015.

Charis Thompson in the journal Nature - Researchers and ethicists need to see past what can seem to be gendered debates when it comes to the governance of biotechnology. See full article.